Plants, Fruits & Vegetables

All matter of flora are added in order of their records. As we work to relearn all the lost information, it helps to keep meticulous notes on all newly rediscovered species. 

Notes are added according to discoverer and documenter experiences, but may be bolstered with later accounts if new information can be added.

Most known species are safe to handle and ingest, however some have been found to be unsafe and will be marked accordingly. Please be wary of new plants!

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Zingy Berries

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Approximate size: Real-world grapes
Seasonal Growth: Spring to Summer


These colorful berries cover vines growing around Whistler Crest, and can grow just about anywhere with an ample amount of sunlight. While they seem easy to tend to, zingy berry vines can get out of hand and take up an entire garden if you're not careful! Though they have a very candy-like appearance, the unsuspecting Draken or Nyulop can end up with puckered lips if they pop one of these in their mouth carelessly!

Can I grow them?
Yes you can! But be wary, they're a vine like plant, so they can grow out of control easily if left unattended!

 

Can I eat them?
You can! They have the crisp texture of grapes, but always taste like the tiny sour candies. Their sourness has quite a kick to it, making it difficult to eat more than just a few at a time.


Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆

Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆

Lightning Spuds

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Approximate size: Real-world pears
Seasonal Growth: Mid-Late Summer


This uniquely coloured fruit is rumored to only grow after thunderstorms...and only where lightning strikes the earth. The trees are uncommon, but not exceedingly rare either. They usually grow in forests, but are often times found standing alone in the center of an open field with little to no other vegetation growing around them. They're also notoriously difficult to replant and grow, failing more often than succeeding. Despite the challenges of growing them, they are still highly sought after as they taste incredibly sweet!

Can I grow them?
They're rather difficult to come by, and their very existence is a game of chance! They would be near impossible to grow without the right magic!

 

Can I eat them?
Yes you can! They sort of have a tanginess similar to a key-lime pie, but with an additional sweetness to them.


Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★

Difficult Harvesting: ★★★☆☆

Heart's Desire

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Approximate size: Real-world apples (small) 

Seasonal Growth: Spring to Early Summer

 

You always know when Heart's Desire are in bloom as they waft an incredibly alluring scent that spreads for miles around. They normally start blooming mid-February and go until the end of May. Groves of these trees are often tended to by farmers as the fruits grow plentifully and bake perfectly into pies and cakes. However, one should be careful, because biting into a newly ripened Heart's Desire can make you act...a little dopey. The effects wear off within a few minutes.

 

Can I grow them? 

Yes you can! Although, be wary, their scent can be alluring...you don't want to eat your entire plant all at once!
 

Can I eat them?

Yes you can! They taste like sweetened candies. Mostly like some sort of mixture between strawberries and cherries.
 

Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆

Difficult Harvesting: ★★☆☆☆

King's Head Melon

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Approximate size: Real-world watermelon (but larger and heavier!)

Seasonal Growth: Summer

 

The large sized melons can be a bit difficult for fledgling Nyulop and Draken to lift and carry! You usually need teams of two to manage one of these big fruits...or some serious ingenuity. But they are worth it! A single one of these melons can easily feed a big group, and they're deliciously refreshing. They're ground fruits, growing in patches with long and thick vines, so you also need to cut away to get them free. Trust me, they're worth all this effort!

 

Can I grow them? 

Not unless you have the room! These big melons need a lot of space to spread out and grow, and because they all grow off a vine-like plant, they can take up quite a bit of space!


Can I eat them?

Yes, you can! They have a taste somewhere between a watermelon and a cantaloupe. They're still very watery, but super sweet!
 

Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆

Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★☆

Twin Moon Pods

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Approximate size: Real-world bananas 

Seasonal Growth: Year-Round

 

These fruits are incredibly rare and somewhat difficult to locate, unless you're hunting at night, of course! Because, oddly enough, they glow. We're sure they're still edible... They grow high in treetops, making them hard to spot unless it's dark out, in which case they can light up the night in an eerie sort of way. The trees they can be found in are tall with seemingly branchless trunks, hidden in a thick canopy of dark green leaves. Twin Moons are incredibly delicious, although their flavour varies from person to person, so it's said. One person might find they taste sweet, some might find they taste tangy, but they always taste good to the eater. It's no wonder they're so highly sought after.

 

Can I grow them? 

No one knows how to grow them...so that would be impossible!
 

Can I eat them?

You sure can! They're quite a delicacy, considering how rare they are, so don't let an opportunity go to waste!
 

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★

Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★☆

Shooting Star Fruit

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Approximate size: Real-world pears

Seasonal Growth: Varies, usually growing in late summer to late autumn

 

This fruit is said to grow from trees that sprout where falling stars struck the Earth itself. The trees grow large, seemingly reaching back towards the sky, some think, in a hopeless attempt to rejoin the stars. These fruits have a tendency to grow more frequently when days start growing shorter and nights become longer, meaning they're very common around harvest time. However, some stray trees have been spotted growing in summer...so with some luck you'll be able to grab one of these fruits for yourselves!

 

Can I grow them? 

They don't seem to transplant well from their original trees. Unfortunately.
 

Can I eat them?

Yes you can! They're extremely tasty, sweet and tangy, making them a perfect substitute for candy...eat healthier, kids!
 

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★

Difficult Harvesting: ★★★☆☆

Mushrooms

 

Fancy Collar Shroom

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Approximate size: Varies (Largest size on record had a cap the width of a Frisbee.)
Seasonal Growth: Spring to Summer

Fancy Collar Shrooms are named for their unique collar like frill which grows out from under the cap. They're a moderately common fungus that grows around Whistler Crest, and they're often seen in vibrant shades of purple and pink. They can vary in size, but are rarely found to have caps larger than a Frisbee. It would also appear that this particular fungus is very invasive, as there are few competing types of mushrooms growing around the immediate area. Most of the time they're picked and used sparingly in particular dishes. It is advised that you not eat them raw or in large quantities. They're not toxic, but ingesting them without proper preparation can lead to...interesting outcomes. It will make you act loopy! Locals call the behaviour "shrooming". They are most commonly found in shaded areas. They grow around the bases of houses, other buildings, and large trees. They'll be easier to find in the forest, largely because of all the construction in town uprooting or destroying them, but you may find them in some untouched areas. They are easy to pick, same as harvesting anything that's just rooted to the ground.

Can I grow them? 
Yes, you can! But they need cool places that aren't always in direct sunlight!

Can I eat them?
You can...but just be careful how you prepare them!

Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆

Speckled Shroom

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Approximate size: 5-8 inches (12-20 cm)
Seasonal Growth: Late spring to summer

Unlike a certain lookalike mushroom, Speckled Shrooms (alternatively known as Pepper Shrooms) are actually edible and an excellent source of fiber! These mushrooms grow in clusters, sometimes having a shunshroom mixed in, so you better look carefully before you touch!

Can I grow them? 
Yes, though they grow all over the place anyway. Make sure to wear gloves just in case a shunshroom is in the mix.

Can I eat them?
Yes, they are very healthy for you and provide ample fiber! They have a very subtle mild flavour.

Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆

Channelium Paper Shroom

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Approximate size: An apple
Seasonal Growth: Autumn to winter

This mushroom grows in dark places and is very sensitive to sunlight, so much so that it becomes very brittle when exposed to sun and will crumble away into a fine dust in your hand! This mushroom is used a lot for it's medicinal use in spiritual ailments, thus they must be harvested only at night.

Can I grow them? 
Due to the nature of these mushrooms they must grow in total darkness with zero sunlight, thus making these very difficult to grow domestically.

Can I eat them?
Yes, they are very healthy and used in certain medicines. 

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★★

Shunshroom

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Approximate size: 5-9 inches
Seasonal Growth: TBA

Looking similar to the Speckled Shroom, the Shunshoom is NOT something you wanna touch or ingest. They are inedible and their spores will do you even more harm. Touching or disturbing this mushroom in any way will release spores that would give you a rash in the shape of a curse mark! This of course is not a real curse, but it has fooled others in the past. These mushrooms are often mixed in with Speckled Shrooms, so look carefully before you pick them, otherwise you'll be blighted with shun spots and many other health hazards. 

Can I grow them? 
No.

Can I eat them?
These mushrooms are a health hazard in every way, eating them causes severe stomach aches and fever, inhaling the spores can give you a nasty cough, and any spores that make contact with your skin with give you itchy rashes called shun spots which can get you shunned from the community if they don't look closely enough. Interacting with this shroom in any way is very ill-advised.

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★★

Bounceshroom

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Approximate size: Always taller than 6'00" 
Seasonal Growth: Spring to Summer 

Bounceshrooms are MASSIVE. No, really. These peculiar mushrooms grow to be well over six feet tall, easily reaching heights of seven to ten feet. Despite their gargantuan size, they're gentle giants, and are completely harmless. They have very elastic, almost rubbery, springy caps and invite creatures to bounce on them! In fact, doing so helps the mushroom release their spores, releasing it into the wind with each jump on them. Their spores, like the mushroom itself, are entirely harmless. These mushrooms can even support the bouncing bodies of two or more adult Draken. They are incredibly strong and resilient! 

Can I grow them? 
It appears that these mushrooms struggle to grow in captivity. They seem to need the nutrients and shade provided to them growing in forests.

Can I eat them?
You can! You can even cut out chunks from this mushroom without killing it. It is described as tasting savory when stewed or fried!

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★★

Ghost Shroom

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Approximate size: About the same size of an average mushroom
Seasonal Growth: Spring-Autumn


First mentions of these mushrooms could be found in old books where they were said to magically appear during the night and the intensity of their luminosity is supposedly connected with the phases of the moon. Only recent discoveries made it possible to put an end to a legendary nature of this elusive plant. The truth is that during the day these mushrooms spontaneously turn transparent, which, connected with their rarity and ordinarily slender dimensions makes them especially easy to overlook for average mushroom-hunters who forage in daylight. Only under the darkness of the night one can easily spot their location, however, who would want to wander through the gloomy forest to harvest them?


Can I grow them?
Currently not much is known on how to grow them.

Can I eat them?
Yes, you can. They are said to have a very refreshing and light taste, so it takes a skill to not make the flavour vanish in the dish.

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★☆ 
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★☆☆

Chilly Hot Shrooms

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Approximate size: The size of your average white mushroom
Seasonal Growth: Summer and winter, sparse in spring and autumn

These tiny mushrooms are known to grow predominantly during the hot summer months and frigid winter months. They are not nearly as common in spring and autumn, but can be found in small patches. These tiny mushrooms are somewhat of an enigma, only recently being re-learned of, and boasting some rather interesting traits. When the mushroom is applied to warmth it becomes incredibly cold, and when applied to cold becomes warm and spicy! They are edible and often used as pranks by subtly mixing them into a victim's hot or cold drink! When eaten raw with not temperature spike they taste rather plain. 

Can I grow them? 
Their small size makes them fairly manageable and easy enough to grow!

Can I eat them?
You can! But, y'know, consider what was said above!

Difficulty Growing: ★☆☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ☆☆☆☆☆

Mysela Stalks

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Approximate size: 25'00"+ on average! VERY large!
Seasonal Growth: Grow all year round but at varying rates

Mysela Stalks are a mammoth sized, fast growing, bioluminescent mushrooms that have the ability to grow year round if preserved in the right conditions. They let their spores only once a year in the fall, and due to the large size of the mother shroom, the spores are large enough to be grabbed in one hand. They appear like oversized dandelion seeds, and float on the breeze in visible clouds for miles before falling. Germination rates are low, so twice as many spores are released in hopes of creating more Mysela Stalks. They have several distinctive features that include a wide, and deep reservoir of rainwater that collects in the center of the mushrooms cap, and the wavy, cattail like glowing antennae that grow from the bottom of said reservoir. The purpose of these antennae isn't that well known yet. However, a fun thing to do while on top of one of these colossal pseudo-trees is to take a dip in the pool of water that collects in these shrooms after a rainstorm! They make fantastic pools as long as they're cleaned out beforehand.

Mysela Stalks, in theory, can be eaten when they're young enough and there's superstitions around them that if you eat juvenile Myselas when you're young, you'll grow taller as an adult. They taste pleasantly buttery with a nutty after tone, and the taste enhances with a bit of pan-frying. The cap however is tough and rubbery and cannot be eaten without being stewed for hours.

Both stalk and cap produce a thin, runny sap in the color of its bioluminescence that must be drained properly before consumption, as its incredibly, nearly tongue-shrivelingly bitter. It's non toxic, but horridly untasty. The sap can be harvested from adult trees in moderation to create natural glowing lights that simply need exposure to some level of light to recharge. They come in colors of Orange, Yellow, Blue, Green, and rarely, Red and Purple.

Can I grow them? 
You simply don't have the space to facilitate the growth of these large shrooms!

Can I eat them?
You can! This is detailed above in the description. 

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★☆

Hydrashroom

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Approximate size: Varies wildly, the original stalk is generally about 1 ft. tall.
Seasonal Growth: Spring-autumn

Named accurately, this mushroom is generally seen with many branching stalks, almost appearing like a tree. They have one main base that the other stalks sprout from, growing smaller and smaller the further it branches. The purple cap with blue spots can be considered pretty, but what the mushroom is known for is... less so. As its name implies, whenever a branch is plucked from a Hydrashroom, or the mushroom itself knocked over, two more mushrooms sprout in its place. The Hydrashroom can grow up to 6 branches naturally, not counting the main branch, so once the branches are knocked off and the duplications begin, things can get... crazy, fast. Hydrashrooms have been documented duplicating as many as 20 times, but are rumored to be able to go even higher than that! These mushrooms can easily get very tall or cover a decent sized area. They'd be a wonderful source of food, if only they didn't taste so bad.

Can I grow them?
Very easily. They're easily planted and easily spread.

Can I eat them?
Yes, you can, but it's not recommended. They have an awful bitter taste and aren't any better cooked.

Difficulty Growing: ★☆☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆

Mustachio Shroom

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Approximate size: 5 inches tall, mustache-like caps are mustache sized!
Seasonal Growth: Available all year round, but most common in early spring

These bristly little shrooms have quite the goofy appearance! A lot of times these are used to pull pranks since they look just like facial hair, seeing some of these in the wild is bound to give someone a laugh. Unlike regular mushrooms, these shrooms don't have gills to release and contain their spores. Instead, the spores are all contained within the coarse, fibrous hairs of this mushroom. A dusty mustache! These shrooms also come in shades of 3 different colors; blonde, brown, and black. 

Can I grow them? 
Yes, these are a very hardy mushroom that is easy to take care of and nurture.

Can I eat them?
While the tops aren't desirable to eat (because it feels like eating something hairy and flavorless), the stems are very tasty with a savory flavor to them and can be eaten raw if desired. 

Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ☆☆☆☆

Glowshroom

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Approximate size: About the height of a fully grown Draken.
Seasonal Growth: Year-round

The Glowshroom is most known for their bright, colorful appearance. They often light up dark forest and provide protection for more nightly-shrooms to grow. It has large bulbs dangling from the inside of the Glowshroom, and when it's pulled on there will be a loud crack and the color will change depending on what bulb you pulled on. However the may look lovely, the Glowshroom's light is made up of a translucent slime that-- if left on the body for a hours-- can become poison and cause the person to come down with a cold. The Glowshroom's translucent light is a process of the nutrients it collects from the sun that is then converted into a light that can be absorbed by other mushrooms; it's seen that mushrooms that grow under a Glowshroom tend to have stronger properties such as size, taste, and a longer life.

Can I grow them? 
Yes, but it's recommended only advanced planters grow them.

Can I eat them?
No, the translucent layer that covers the shroom can cause severe sickness when ingested.

Difficulty Growing: 
★★☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting:  ★★☆☆

 

Plants

Prism Vines

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Approximate size: Varies Drastically
Seasonal Growth: Summer

This vine is a subspecies of a common variety that grows in the forests surrounding Whistler Crest. However, you're not looking for a regular old run of the mill Saper's Vine, but instead looking for it's fancy cousin, the Prism Vine. You'll be able to distinguish this unique piece of vegetation by the presence of mismatched coloured leaves. Unlike a standard Saper's Vine, which only produces green leaves, the Prism Vine grows random leaves of various colours. Noticeable colours such as blue, purple and pink are among the most common, but leaves in red, silver and even gold can be found on occasion. These rare vines can be found growing on just about every type of tree found in the forests surrounding Whistler Crest. They can dangle from the treetops, wrap around the trunks, and are sometimes found littering the ground around the base of trees. They're not terribly thick, but they are relatively strong, and can be a bit of a chore to snap.


Can I grow them? 
You can...but why would you? They can overrun a garden pretty quick! They're an invasive species, so maybe don't...

Can I eat them?
They wouldn't taste very good...but sure? They're no toxic...so...I guess it's fine.

Difficulty Growing: ★☆☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★★☆☆☆

Ice Queen's Crown

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Approximate size: Real-world poinsettia flowers 
Seasonal Growth: Only grows during winter when there's snow on the ground

These beautiful flowers grow only in winter, and only when it's consistently cold and there's a considerable amount of snow (most commonly found after the first three or so snowfalls). The trees themselves grow standard green leaves in the other seasons, but once the weather turns cold enough, they change to a soft teal-blue. When the leaves begin their change you can be sure the flowers are not far behind! The bark of the tree is typically white (think birch bark) with elegant swirls of a sapphire-like blue. The flowers themselves vary in hues of blue, but they all are cool to the touch, and smell fresh like a winter's day. Their scent is said to have a calming effect, and they're often used to combat any glum feelings felt during the winter months. Due to their beauty, and their heartiness, they're often picked and used for decorations around the holidays.

Can I grow them? 
To any young budding botanist (or anyone else interested in caring for plants!), these flowers are notoriously difficult to grow, and seem to only thrive in forested areas. They require constant cold and the presence of snow to grow.

Can I eat them?
They are perfectly safe to ingest (but why would you? They're so pretty!). They crunch like leafy greens but taste like you're eating freshly fallen snow.

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★★☆☆☆

Moontallow Potter Plant

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Approximate size: Real-world Pitcher Plant
Seasonal Growth: Year-Round

Frequently referred to as the much easier to remember "Moontallow Pot" due to its wide, sloping flower's pot or vase-like appearance. These plants are incredibly hardy, surviving and reproducing year-round, only record freezes able to kill off the peculiarly colored vessel. Inside the walls of the large, deep pots that grow from the plant's singular stem is a thick ooze that collects at the bottom. As it does so, it solidifies within the span of a day or two into a yellowish-white substance with the same vague consistency of real-world coconut oil. The small vine above the pitcher flowers every so often, and when it does the seeds produced fall into the pitcher, quickly becoming covered by the buttery substance produced by the plant. The seeds are then spread by creatures consuming or harvesting the moontallow, carrying the seeds with them until they are thrown away or otherwise distributed elsewhere. The moontallow produced by the plant has a great many uses, and is most often used as a spread for sandwiches and toast, a base for soaps, and a substitute for butter in baking among many others.

Can I grow them? 
Moontallow Pots are very easy to grow, and thrive in pretty much any soil so long as its fertile. The only thing that may trip first-time green thumbs up is the very large volume of water they require daily, as much as an entire watering can for some plants. Even then, it isn't hard for even beginners to grow, as overwatering is often the downfall of any gardener's first garden.

Can I eat them?
Though the plant itself may not be particularly mouth-watering, the slippery moontallow butter-like substance is both safe and very delicious. It can be eaten straight from the plant without issue (though a quick clean is often recommended as the moontallow can often contain particulates and seeds) and is very lightly sweet, but not in any regard overwhelming. It has a very light and creamy texture, and quickly melts on the tongue. 

Difficulty Growing: ★☆☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆

Passion Plant

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Approximate size: Real-world cabbage
Seasonal Growth: Year-Round

Passion Plants can be found to the north of Whistler Crest, past the outskirts and into the Morray Woods. They are fairly easy to spot, and are very plentiful as well. If not picked and fertilized within a few weeks of sprouting, they simply blossom as normal, growing into their own beautiful flower. However, their main use to most is to use them for breeding, completing a special ritual to make the plant produce an egg in place of a flower!


Can I grow them? 
No, they will not fare well if taken from the wild. They are made to grow outside away from civilization, and are sure to not continue to grow once relocated out of their original growing place.

Can I eat them? 
No! Don't eat these, not only is bad morally, but the leaves taste very bitter, and the petals will give you a nasty bellyache!

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆

Cloud Root

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Approximate size: Large real-world sweet potato
Seasonal Growth: Year-Round

​These hardy plants are found throughout most of Kladeon, with the exception of desert and overly humid environments. They can withstand cold winters and hot summers, making them an important food for many parts of the continent. In the wild, they often are found growing in fields and forests, their round leaves and puffy, light-blue flowers setting them apart. It's these flowers and the light, cloud-like center of the root that gives these plants their name. All parts of the plants are edible, even the flowers, and that combined with the hardiness makes them a valuable produce.

Can I grow them?
Yes, you can! They're fairly easy to grow and care for, but the large root means that they need plenty of room to grow. But it isn't difficult at all for beginners to grow them.

Can I eat them?
Absolutely! The root itself is the main thing eaten from these plants. Its taste is closest equated to that of potato and can be eaten in a variety of ways, whether that be boiled, mashed, roasted, or even eaten raw if you feel like it. It's crunchy and hard when raw, but softens when cooking. The leaves are also edible, having a lightly sweet flavor. They're often brewed into a tea which helps with sleep. If you wanted to, you could eat the flowers, but they aren't very delicious.

Difficulty Growing: ★☆☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★★☆☆☆

Poppits

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Approximate size: Real world Roses
Seasonal Growth: Spring-Summer


Poppits are seasonal flowers that bloom naturally mainly in the spring, but they can be planted and grow in summer. They require very little humidity to grow.
The dark core of poppits (which carries the plant's seeds) will explode as soon as anything touches the yellow part of the stem's leaf (which usually only carries one leaf). It's not unusual that bugs or even rain trigger off that explosion, so you can find huge groups of these flowers, as their only way to re-polinate is if they explode.The explosion doesn't hurt, it simply flings seeds up to 2 meters in distance, and makes a distinct *pop* sound. 

Due to their quirk, and vivid colors, these flowers are often used in pranks, you can pick them up as long as you don't touch the leaf portion of the plant, and you can give them to an unsuspecting friend , who might trigger the explosion themselves, and will be left with only the stem in their hands. 

They're quite variable in color, often having two close colors (yellow and orange, yellow and green, green and blue etc.) , in a very bright hue. Some might say their colors vary due to the soil's properties, but even in fields they tend to vary quite a bit, the yellow part of the leaf never changes however.

Some children refer to these as Boom Blooms, but their correct name is "Poppits."

Can I grow them?
Yes, granted you collect the seeds that shoot out.

Can I eat them?
The dark core is extremely bitter, and the whole plant is very dry and has no flavour, I dont see why you would eat them.

Difficulty Growing: ★☆☆☆☆ 
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★☆☆

Weeping Pods

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Approximate size: At max, they can grow to 7ft
Seasonal Growth: Spring through Fall, does not grow well over the Winter

Though these plants appear to be wilted and dying, they are actually perfectly healthy. They are grown over most parts of Kladeon as a staple part of diets. During the spring and part of the summer, they lack their characteristic pods that will gradually grow over the summer to be ready by the end of summer or early fall. The pods that grow at the head can be picked and opened to find they are packed with small seeds that can be used in a variety of ways. They can be cooked to be softer, ground into a meal, or even cooked until they pop! The small flowers that hang from the head also give off a lightly sweet scent.
Weeping Pods, Three-Pearled Blooms, and Boulder Squash are frequently grown together, as they benefit each other.

Can I grow them?
You can! They aren’t too difficult to grow, however they are big plants and need room to grow tall!

Can I eat them?
The stalk and the outside of the pods are not that delicious, having a bit of a bitter taste, however the seeds inside the pod are delicious! They can be cooked to be softer, as when they are raw they are very hard and crunchy. They can be ground into a meal or even popped! The taste is equivalent to real world corn. The pods can also be used as feed for Csirkatrice and other livestock.

Difficulty Growing: ★★★☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★★☆☆☆

Three-Pearled Blooms

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Approximate size: Varies quite a lot in height. The flowers are about the size of a finley’s hand
Seasonal Growth: Spring through Summer, does not grow over Fall and Winter

These teal blooms can grow all over the more moderate and warm parts of Kladeon, climbing any surface they can. They are known to grow quite tall, but not nearly to the sizes Prism vines are able to reach. When the flowers open up, they reveal three round pods growing inside that the plant is named for. Though these “pearls” themselves are edible, each one contains seeds that are equally as edible and very nutritious.
Weeping Pods, Three-Pearled Blooms, and Boulder Squash are frequently grown together, as they benefit each other

Can I grow them?
You can! They aren’t too difficult to grow, however, they will need something to climb, and you should be aware of how tall they can grow.

Can I eat them?
Depends on what part! The pearls, though a bit chewy when raw, can be cooked to have a more pleasant texture. The seeds inside the pearls can also be plucked out and cooked on their own, having a hearty taste to them. The pods and seeds are very nutritious. The sprouts can also be eaten.

Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆

Boulder Squash

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Approximate size: Squash can be as small as a mini pumpkin, to half the height of a baby Draken!
Seasonal Growth: Spring through Summer, does not grow over Fall and Winter

It’s quite clear where Boulder Squashes’ name came from: their rock-like appearance! The rind of these squash comes in grey, and are splotched with green on the top that makes it appear they have moss growing on them. The squash can vary in their shape, always looking similar to rocks. But it’s not just their appearance that’s boulder-like. The squashes themselves are quite heavy and the rind of the Boulder Squash is very tough. But once you cut into the squash, you’ll find an orange flesh that’s much softer and plenty of edible seeds.
Weeping Pods, Three-Pearled Blooms, and Boulder Squash are frequently grown together, as they benefit each other.

Can I grow them?
Yes! They aren’t very difficult to grow, just be aware that they can grow quite large with the right care.

Can I eat them?
You can eat them. The rind is very tough and hard to cut into, but the flesh inside is much softer. It can be scooped out and eaten raw or cooked. The taste is mild, and comparable to a real world winter squash. The seeds are also edible, though are much better cooked than raw.

Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★☆☆

Pink-Tipped Burgeus

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Approximate size: Real-world daisy
Seasonal Growth: Spring-Summer

Pink Tipped Burgeus are a seasonal flower species that generally sprout up during summer but can be planted earlier to be able to start growing in spring. These flowers require a high amount of freshwater to survive, as such they are often found around rivers and lakes. What makes Pink Tipped Burgeus flowers so helpful is that once fully bloomed if you pick them around that time, you can dry the petals out to where they're easy to crush up. If pounded or crushed up to a powder, this powder is completely sweet and can mix into cooking to bring some sweetness into a dish.

Can I grow them?
You could, if you have exceptionally damp soil that's easy to access.

Can I eat them?
Technically yes? But why eat them raw when you get a much sweeter taste from when they're dried and crushed into powder.

Difficulty Growing: ★★★☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆

 

Dangerous!

Moonsplitter Flower

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Approximate size: Real-world tiger lily
Seasonal Growth: Spring, Summer, and Fall

This flower's first claim to fame was as one of the main poisons used to kill a young king during the toast of his coronation in a very well-known book series, but the tale's shocking twist was based very much in reality. The oils from the petals and stem of the Moonsplitter flower is well known throughout history as being the prime choice poison... should one desire such a thing. The flower is incredibly lethal, and even being in the same vicinity of it could potentially kill you. One should wear respiratory masks when dealing with this flower or the bees that pollinate it, as the pollen entering your lungs poses a particular threat due to how difficult it then is to get out before something bad happens. Luckily, though they can grow in most temperate climates all throughout the year except winter, for a yet unknown reason they prefer to grow higher up, and often grow on cliffs and the higher branches of trees. However, finding them on the ground is possible, and they should be avoided at all costs if possible.


Can I grow them? 
You may not. Due to their incredibly hazardous nature one requires a special license to legally grow them, but even besides that the flowers are capricious and very rarely seem to want to grow in captivity.

Can I eat them?
Absolutely not! Ingestion would cause a most certain, and most unpleasant death both to witness and to experience. 

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★★

Needless Nettles

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Approximate size: Dandelion leaves
Seasonal Growth: Spring through summer and into autumn

These plants are thought to have once been called Needle Nettles in the Old World, but in recent decades it has been renamed Needless Nettles as they are considered more of a nuisance than anything else. Their only value comes from the buds they produce, which harden into a gem-stone like rock, and can be sold for high value to some shops. Their buds vary in colour, ranging from pinks to blues to yellows, and are notoriously difficult to harvest. To the unsuspecting passerby, the bud may be tempting to grab, and when touched the leaves produce hundreds of spines to puncture whatever is grabbing at them. They then inject the perceived threat with a relatively harmless venom that causes mild pain and intense itching. Be mindful to pluck the bud straight up from the center while avoiding the leaves.

This plant can deal tier 1 to tier 3 level damage depending on size.

Can I grow them?
Not really, they seem to act like weeds and grow of their own accord.

Can I eat them?
It is advised that consumption of these leaves be avoided as they can be painful to eat and difficult to digest.

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★☆

Kaboom Shroom

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Approximate size: Size of a closed human fist
Seasonal Growth: Spring through summer and into autumn

These fungi are considered to be extremely dangerous! The smaller the mushroom, the less devastating their blast, but they can still dish some damage. When plucked, the vibrant orange-red line that's found up along the stem of the shroom, will start to slowly disappear as it moves up towards the cap. When it reaches the cap the mushroom explodes and releases a thick black cloud of spores into the air. If you are holding a sizable enough shroom it can and will deal some damage! Be very careful around these mushrooms and do not harvest them without protective gear.

This mushroom can deal tier 1 to tier 4 level damage depending on size.

Can I grow them?
It is ill-advised to attempt to grow these! Do not!

Can I eat them?
They are not edible.

Difficulty Growing: ★★★★★
Difficult Harvesting: ★★★★★

Exclusive to Xaaida

 

Fleet Berries

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Approximate size: Real world blueberries
Seasonal Growth: Year-round

Fleet Berries are hardy bushes that grow only on the island of Xaaida. It seems they prominently grow in open fields, and do not grow well indoors, as if they need to be able to feel the breeze. These bushes withstand strong winds and cold surprisingly well. The small yellow berries that grow on the bushes are often eaten by travelers for one reason: the berries are known to be very energizing! Eating these berries can make one feel full of energy and are great for long journeys or even to help wake you up in the morning. Eating too many can have the opposite effect though- eating tons can make you feel sluggish and completely drained. It’d have to be a lot, a whole bush for example.

Can I grow them?
Only if they’re grown outside! These bushes refuse to grow indoors, but if planted outside, they grow just fine. Outside of that, they don’t need much special care, as they are quite hardy.

Can I eat them?
Yes! The berries are edible and quite nutritious, having a slightly tart, sweet flavor to them. They can give you a small burst of energy when eaten, making them perfect to take on travels. This energy is the same for kids and adults.

Difficulty Growing: ★★☆☆☆
Difficult Harvesting: ★☆☆☆☆